Archive for the ‘Epilepsy’ Category

June 17, 2014 · by James White, MD · Education, Epilepsy, Patient Information

INTRODUCTION An important question that we get asked at the Minnesota Epilepsy Group is: “Do I still have epilepsy?” The question is pertinent in several clinical situations. For example, if a child “outgrows” their epilepsy, does that mean that their epilepsy is in remission? What about a 48 year-old man who had two seizures during…

September 10, 2013 · by James White, MD · Education, Epilepsy, News, Patient Information, Treatment

Marijuana has been used for the treatment of medical conditions for over 4000 years. The medical use of marijuana is currently a hotly debated topic. There are some anecdotal reports of patients using marijuana to treat seizures. The popular media has recently run stories about patients using marijuana for their epilepsy. Some patients describe that marijuana improves…

August 16, 2012 · by James White, MD · Education, Epilepsy, Featured Topics, Patient Information, Women with epilepsy

Did you know that patients with epilepsy have a higher incidence of migraine headaches (and vice-versa!)? Patients are usually referred to our clinic for evaluation of their seizures. I will routinely ask patients about their headaches. If the patient has problematic headaches, treatment of the headaches may dramatically improve their quality of life. It is…

August 1, 2012 · by James White, MD · Education, Epilepsy, Featured Topics, Patient Information

INTRODUCTION A common question that we receive in clinic relates to the chance that a parent will “pass on” their epilepsy to their children. Also, if one child has epilepsy, will their brother or sister develop epilepsy? These are important questions. The answer is, of course, complicated. The answers to such questions must be tailored…

July 11, 2012 · by James White, MD · Education, Epilepsy, Featured Topics, Patient Information

I would like to direct our readers towards an interesting study.  This study did very long-term follow-up on children who had surgery to control they’re seizures (Skirrow, Neurology, 2011). They looked at: seizure control intellectual function  (measured by neuropsychological testing before and after surgery) The study found that epilepsy surgery improved seizure control dramatically and many…

May 4, 2011 · by James White, MD · Education, Epilepsy, Patient Information

ARTICLE HIGHLIGHTS Long-term use of certain seizure medications can result in thinning of a person’s bones. Reduced bone density results in osteopenia (mild bone density loss) or osteoporosis (severe bone density loss). Osteoporosis can be very problematic for quality of life! Low bone density predisposes people to bone fractures.  People with epilepsy are at higher…